Is Your Business Network Vulnerable?

Posted by David Rucker and Gretchen Thomas on March 3, 2021
Business Continuity Plan, Cybersecurity, Managed Services

Is my business network vulnerable? That’s a question that keeps many business owners awake at night. Penetration tests for business networks often show that a network is most vulnerable from the inside. For example, it is not unusual when people write down their passwords and put them on their desks. I see it all the time.

Awareness of Local Exploitation

It’s important to be aware of the fact that there are vulnerabilities that can be exploited locally by individuals with the intent to steal data or cripple a business. Some might pose as a repairman or janitor. Some might be dumpster diving searching for information like account numbers, contact names, and numbers. And they want to breach your business to access your data.

The Value of Your Data

Your company’s data is the meat on the bones. It’s the most vital part of your business. Everything but the data can be replaced. So, if hackers can access your network and take your data, that can be devastating to your business. Too many businesses don’t realize how crucial it is to have their servers and networking equipment physically secure with a locked door or cabinet.

My Experience with Business Network Vulnerability

In my previous experience, I performed work for a large business that worked with sensitive, protected data. I brought it to the attention of management that the building’s network had a physically exposed element that could have been exploited by a hacker posing as a repairman or janitor.

This is why I continue to encourage the clients I work with to secure their network.

The following article (and video) is a great resource to understand how businesses can increase their network security. In non-techy language, it explains the most common network vulnerabilities. It even includes things like shoulder surfing, tailgating, and dumpster diving.

Read the full article: Common Types Of Network Security Vulnerabilities In 2020

At Least Put a Lock on the Door

The above article says businesses should have biometric authentication (fingerprint or face recognition) and access cards to protect servers. While I agree with this one-hundred percent, it is better than nothing to at least have a lock on the door and managers holding the keys.

David Rucker, Service Engineer
David Rucker
Service Engineer | + posts

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